Narrative Writing

Narratives

Narratives can often be considered recounts but they do more than just retell past events in sequence. The purpose is to interest and entertain.

Narrative
Parts/Sections
Features
Orientation
(may include complication)
- who, what, where and when is outlined
- problem or issue may be outline too/this can be the why
- descriptive and active words can be used
- draw the audience in through imagination
Sequence of events (may include complication), rising action, evaluation
- each paragraph may be about a different part of the story or develop one idea further
- the complication can be in the middle section too
- a lot of description and imagery used to interest
- action rises to a climax or highest point in this section
Resolution/ending (may include a coda)
- story concludes, is resolved, ends are unravelled
- if a coda is used there is a moral to the story

Look at the following website to see some values that may inspire your writing
http://www.values.com/teaching-values

Short Story Writing Workshop

This cycle you will become the author of a short story. In class we will discuss the method of writing short stories and prepare a plan, a draft of a story and a final piece of writing.

Open the following file and complete the tasks.

Creative My shoes.docx

The same information is written below.

Work Sheet Information

Creative writing – Narratives
To be in someone else’s shoes

Students will
• define point of view and discuss the importance of perspective in writing.

• explore the role of perspective in the stories that someone tells.

• write a story from someone else's point-of-view.

Session One
Introduce the activity by displaying and reading the quotation from To Kill a Mockingbird that inspires the activity: "You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it" (36).

Ask students to consider what the quotation means—what is the speaker trying to explain? What does the speaker mean by the term point of view? How does perspective, or point of view, come into play in writing? Introduce the idea of empathy and discuss its relationship to the quotation.

Ask the students what they are currently reading in their lit circles book. What events in the story to this point can they relate to this quote?

Ask the kids to find a picture of a shoe on line – it could be old, new, big or small.

Ask students to brainstorm details based on their first impressions of the shoes in their writer's notebooks. Give them approximately five minutes to gather ideas.

After examining the shoes, ask students to envision the owner of the shoe and complete the Walking in Someone Else's Shoes handout, writing their answers in their writer's notebooks or on notebook paper.
Google the following for the work sheet
Walking in Someone Else's Shoes - ReadWriteThink PDF

When finished analyzing the shoe's owner, students share their answers in class. There are always a lot of laughs at this point as students reveal details about the invented owners, share your ideas with the class.

Now it is time to write your own story
Story Planner
- who, what, where and when is outlined

- problem or issue may be outline too/this can be the why

- descriptive and active words can be used

- draw the audience in through imagination

Sequence of events (may include complication), rising action, evaluation - each paragraph may be about a different part of the story or develop one idea further

- the complication can be in the middle section too

- a lot of description and imagery used to interest

- action rises to a climax or highest point in this section

Resolution/ending (may include a coda)- story concludes, is resolved, ends are unraveled
- if a coda is used there is a moral to the story

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